My Grandpa Was a Man Among Men

This story is brought you by the Cuyahoga County Veterans Service Commission:

By Taylor Moore

Fred Moore Tomb of the Unknown SoldierHe was African-American. He was drafted in 1959. He made history. He was my grandfather.

SP/4 Fred Moore was the first black troop to join the 3rd Infantry Brigade, The Old Guard, which since 1948 has guarded the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

When his draft notice arrived, the Cleveland native was not pleased. ”I was working and the draft notice just rubbed me the wrong way.” The last place he wanted to be was in Army basic training, where life dramatically changes.

Fate had other ideas.

At Fort Knox, Kentucky, he marched instead of walking. There was no dining room; he ate in the mess hall. Shoes were replaced by boots. No private bed or bedroom; Moore slept on a bunk bed in the barracks. He learned to accurately fire a rifle and clean it well enough to satisfy his drill sergeant.

His platoon sergeant told the new troops, “The Army can do more to you than you can do to the Army.” The sergeant should have said, “The Army can do more for you than you can do for the Army.”

While still in basic training, he was called to an officer’s office. The officer told Moore he had scored exceptionally well on tests. At 6 feet 1 inch, Moore was an impressive troop.

The officer asked Moore if he would like to be in the Honor Guard Company.

Moore had no idea what the officer was talking about.

The officer told Moore the 3rd Infantry Brigade was called The Old Guard. Among its duties, The Old Guard protected the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. The Tomb is on a hilltop in Arlington National Cemetery. Come hell or high water, these spit-shined troops faithfully perform their duties.

Moore accepted the assignment.

The Old Guard Honor Company also provides an escort platoon, a casket platoon, a firing party, and a color guard. Moore was first assigned to the firing party. “We served military funerals in Arlington National Cemetery. Sometimes we did funerals every half hour.”

There was more. He and his unit were part of parades and ceremonies. For visiting dignitaries, his unit was assigned as the ceremonial guard.

Though there is a spectacular view of Washington, D.C., visitors don’t pay much attention to the scenery. They are focused on the white marble sarcophagus and the lone soldier who guards it, 21 steps at a time. While there has been a 24-hours-a-day, seven days a week military guard at the Tomb since July of 1937, the 4th Battalion, 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard) didn’t assume its watch until 1948.

“You were busy all the time. You were busy, just about every day. When I first got there, once I got my training and settled into the company, I was on the military firing party, we did military funerals in Arlington National Cemetery,” Moore recalled. “We fired the rifles over the graves, and we did that five days out of the week. Sometimes, we would have burials every half-hour on the hour.

“The next thing I know, the word came back to the company that they told me to get my stuff, I was moving out of the 3rd Platoon, I was going down to the Tomb Guard platoon, I was going into training, and that was in January. So I went into training in January and in March I became a guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier,” he said.

My grandpa was a man among men. He is loving, modest, and his service to the Unknown Soldier is exemplary.



Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame

The Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame was created by former Governor George V. Voinovich in 1992 to demonstrate his concern for Ohio veterans returning home due to military downsizing as a result of the end of the Cold War.

Former Ohio Bureau of Employment Services’ Administrator, James Conrad, proposed the Hall of Fame to recognize the post-military achievements of outstanding veterans and realized how such a program would spotlight all veterans’ contributions to the civilian workplace.

In 1992, a special panel of representatives from the state’s veterans organizations was brought together to discuss the idea of establishing the Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame. The panel endorsed the idea for the purpose of increasing awareness of the lifetime contributions of veterans after completion of honorable military service.

Charter members of the Hall of Fame included the six Ohio military veterans who were elected president of the United States and all Medal of Honor recipients from Ohio. A committee of veterans serves as advisors for the Hall of Fame and selects up to 20 inductees annually from nominations solicited from all citizens of Ohio throughout the year. Men and women chosen for this honor come from all eras, all branches of service and all walks of life.

The Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame is not a military hall of fame. Those selected for the honor are veterans who have honorably served their country and who have continued to serve and inspire their fellow man with their deeds and accomplishments throughout their lifetime.

Harry A. Donovan

Harry A. Donovan
Summit County
United States Navy Veteran
World War II

Harry Donovan returned from his service in the Navy during World War II and enrolled at the University of Akron. He became a Certified Public Accountant who, after working for others, started his own firm. Harry has also been an active volunteer all his life in his community and with veterans.

He is a life member of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 349 and an active supporter of the Wounded Warrior Project. He has established a scholarship fund for children of veterans. He is a donor and volunteer with the Summit County Stand-Down for homeless and displaced veterans as well as at the new Valor Home, a 30-bed facility for homeless veterans named after his son, Harry Donovan, Jr., a Vietnam veteran.

In the greater Akron community, Harry has served on the boards of the Fairlawn Chamber of Commerce, the Honor Flight of Akron/Canton, Hospice & Palliative Care of the Visiting Nurse Service, and Open-M, a non-profit consisting of all faith organizations that provides food, health care, tutoring and social services for those in need. He was honored in 2012 as Summit County Veteran of the Year. Harry Donovan has given selfless service to many causes.


Piston Power Auto Rama and the I-X Center – Support Veterans

Screen Shot 2015-09-12 at 7.37.51 AMThe I-X Center and Piston Powered Auto-Rama didn’t have to do this, but they did.
They partnered with the Medina VFW 5137, and three chapters of Rolling Thunder to honor veterans from the Vietnam War. Rad-Air Complete Car Care is presenting the show.
All are commemorating the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Vietnam War.
The I-X Center, presenters, and partners donated their time, money, salutes, and expenses to say, “Thank you for your service.”
And we say, “You’re welcome.”
Not all of our comrades are here to express their gratitude. Many are in cemeteries here and across the country. Many more will join them. A stand down in the heavens.
Steve Legerski / Show Manager, added, “We wanted to note the sacrifice of our troops, and when we say, ‘Thank you,’ we also express our heartfelt sympathies to those family members and friends who suffered greatly.”
If readers of DD 214 Chronicle wish to express their gratitude to the sponsors who didn’t forget us, send a note or a personal call to the honorary commanding officer, Steve Legerski / Show Manager 216-265-2514 /
On behalf of veterans, their families, and all who love us, we say, “Thank you, Steve, for keeping us in your thoughts.”
John H. Tidyman
11 Bravo 40

Buckeye Hero Hunt

Buckeye Hero Hunt, October 9-11, 2015 in the Zaleski State Forest

The Buckeye Hero Hunt is a Bow/Crossbow deer hunt in Southeastern Ohio. This hunt provides a *qualified disabled veteran with the opportunity to experience a guided and assisted deer hunt.

This opportunity is at no cost to the veteran or sponsor. All meals, lodging, equipment, guides, and deer processing will be provided. Applications must be received before Sept 18, 2015. For more information or to get an application by email contact:

Bob Hope: The model of patriotism, generosity, and commitment to each and every one of us

Bob Hope AF Brought to you by: Cuyahoga County Veterans Service Commission

Good thing rank has nothing to do with popularity.

Bob Hope would have been our Commander-in-Chief for four wars: WWII, Korea, Vietnam, and the Middle East.

To say our Honorary Commander-in-Chief had heart for us damns by faint praise. He had an enormous heart for every grunt, swabbie, flyboy, and jarhead. He cared for each one of us. When he stopped to visit and entertain us, he was one of us.

And he proved it. He went where we were. He was committed to making troops smile and laugh. He made us laugh during war’s intermissions. He was indefatigable: Fifty seven trips to our troops. Where Hope found his energy and commitment, we’ll never know. All we know for sure is that we’re grateful. He made memories for us that will always be with us.bob hope in korea i hope

During the Vietnam War, some entertainers balked at Hope’s request to join the troupe. But Hope didn’t care so much about the politics behind war; he cared about the men and women in dirty uniforms and worried faces, and to hell with political correctness.

He could toss barbs with the best of them. He asked troops in Vietnam, “And did you read where President Johnson just requested another $50 billion to cover the rising cost of the war? Wouldn’t it be awful if we ran out of money and they repossessed the war?”

At an age when most of us are dreaming about retirement, the 61-year old trouper brought his joy and comradeship to Vietnam in 1964.

Taking entertainment to the troops was a complicated task carried out.hope and sailors

On a few of his tours, Hope was the only star. In others, he brought with him a galaxy of stars: Irving Berlin and Doris Day; Anita Ekberg, Jerry Colonna, and Hedda Hopper; Ginger Rogers and Jayne Mansfield; Mickey Mantle and Andy Williams; Tuesday Weld and Gina Lollobrigida; Johnny Bench, Jim Nabors, and Jill St. John; Brooke Shields and Miss USA Julie Hayek; Hootie and the Blowfish, Alan Jackson, Salt & Peppa, Boyz II Men, and LaToya Jackson; The Pointer Sisters and Ann Jillian. And Racquel Welch.Hope and 101st

If there’s a heaven, our friend and Honorary Commander-in-Chief Bob Hope is lounging in the clubhouse, waiting for us. He wants to welcome us home. We want to say “Thank you, from the bottom of our hearts.” Thank you, Bob Hope, for the memories.Hope in Navy cap Cuyahoga County Veterans Service Commission brings this story to you. Click Here for more information:


Hope en route to Nam


Women in Uniform

Lt.EmilyPerezLt. Emily Perez,
We Hardly Knew Ye
by John H. Tidyman, editor

War has little regard for the lives of its combatants.
No regard at all for widows, widowers, friends, family members, neighbors, or fellow troops. At the gravesite, saying, “Goodbye forever,” is sad and somber duty.
Once in uniform, every trooper’s life is a matter of training, experience, and leadership. And good fortune. There are no guarantees.
Second Lt. Emily Perez died in Iraq. She led a convoy in Iraq when it hit a roadside bomb.
She graduated from West Point in 2005, where she was the highest ranking black and Hispanic woman graduate. Not just in 2005, but in history.
At West Point, she was a member of the gospel choir and the track team. She was indefatigable. She was proud of her country, West Point, and herself.
She was an officer assigned to Fourth Infantry Division, “Steadfast and Loyal.”
Today, the young lieutenant’s body rests in the West Point cemetery. Read more stories on our current issue.

Tri-C’s Veterans Upward Bound Director Wardsey Gates Dies

Wardsy GatesDear Student Veterans, Friends & Colleagues:
It is with a very heavy heart that I inform all you of the untimely passing of Tri-C’s Veterans Upward Bound Director, Wardsey Gates, this past Saturday night from a heart attack.  An Army veteran, Wardsey served both his country and the College with distinction.  Under his leadership over the past seven years, the Tri-C Veterans Bound Program rose to the top as a national model program within the VUB – TRIO Community.  In fact, Tri-C’s Veterans Upward Bound Program is the oldest of its kind in the nation coming into existence in 1972.
Information about funeral services will be forthcoming.  I ask that all keep Wardsey and his family in your prayers.
Rick DeChant
Executive Director, Veterans Initiative
Cuyahoga Community College
Metropolitan Campus  MSS 501-B
2900 Community College Ave.
Cleveland, OH 44115-3193
PH: 216-987-3193
Tri-C® Where futures begin SM